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How to become Children’s Night Out Organizer to make money for individuals want to quit their jobs and start their careers as an entrepreneur are as follows:
Description of Job
• Organize care and entertainment for children for a specific period of time.
• Provide temporary care for parents on vacation or traveling for business.
• Offer a regular program of activities for parents seeking a night off from
their youngsters.
The Need
Even parents have rights and needs.
How does this sound for a typical family vacation for a mother, father, and two
young children? Rise at 7 A.M. for a frenetic breakfast, then spend all day at the
beach, the ballpark, or at a theme park. Lunch comes in a cardboard box and the
paper napkins double as coloring pages for the kids. By dinnertime the kids are
running on 220 volts while the parents would do just about anything for an hour
or so of quiet and a dinner where the butter pats are not shaped like mouse ears.
Alternatively, it may be a matter of business necessity: Mom and dad are on
the road for a business convention and both are expected to be at a formal reception
that night . . . and the kids are not invited or expected.
Even in the comfortable environs of home, a little bit of safe separation
between parents and children is almost certainly good for both.
A children’s-night-out program is short-term care for children, usually for a
specified period of time and often with a particular theme: a movie night, a costume
ball, a pizza party, video games, or live entertainment by a magician, clown,
or small theater group. The program can be presented to tourists on a one-time
basis or to locals on a regular schedule.
Challenges
The biggest challenge—one that takes precedence over anything else—is provision
of a safe location and adequate supervision for young children.
Unless you are running a regularly scheduled program, you will not know
most of the children in your care, and few will have friends with them.
You should set very specific age limits and stick to them; if you will be accepting
very young children, set a policy about whether you will welcome only toilettrained
clients. You will also want to avoid mixing very young children with
young teens; neither group is likely to be happy to be included with the other.
The simplest plan would also exclude any transportation of the children; have
the parents bring the youngsters to your location and pick them up at the specified
time. Providing pickup and delivery or planning to take your charges to
another location would require a van or bus approved for the transport of children,
a licensed driver, and appropriate insurance.
Parents should be asked to fill out a form with full details of where they will
be, as well as cell phone numbers and other contact information. Obtain the name
of another close family member or a trusted friend of the parents as an additional
contact. Your contract should include language that permits you to secure emergency
medical treatment for the child if necessary. The parents should be asked
to provide information about any medical condition or allergies the child has.
Most child care operations also reserve the right to refuse a child who is obviously
sick.
Know the Territory
If your area has schools, resorts, convention centers, or theme parks, you should
have a good market of clients.
You’ll need to find a location for the program, preferably near parents’ homes
or their hotels. The facility will have to be childproofed and will likely have to
pass inspection from local or state regulators.
One possible solution: Run the program in a ballroom or convention room at
a hotel, in cooperation with the management there. The hotel will likely ask for a
rental payment for the use of the room or a percentage of your take; you should
encourage the hotel to think of your program as a guest service that may encourage
adults to use their restaurants and other facilities while their children are
properly cared for.
How to Get Started
Spend the time to get to know about convention centers, resorts, hotels, and other
attractions in your area that may bring in visitors. Get to know hotel concierges
and convention planners who might refer business your way.
Place flyers and business cards on bulletin boards at community centers.
Some restaurants and theaters may be willing to allow you to post your flyer at
their establishment.
Contact some of the day camps in the area and ask them to recommend your
services to parents looking for child care in the evening.
Place ads in community newspapers.
Up-front Expenses
Expenses will include advertising and promotion as well as any licenses and
inspections required for child care facilities. You will have to obtain special business
liability insurance—not all carriers will write policies for child care operations.
If you are running your center at a hotel or on someone else’s property you
will likely require worker’s compensation coverage.
You will probably have to hire assistants; consult with an accountant about
whether they need to be salaried or can be engaged on a work-for-hire basis.
They may also be required to have worker’s compensation coverage.
You may have to invest in some toys, games, TVs, and VCRs.
How Much to Charge
You can charge a flat rate for a specified period of time or an hourly rate with a
minimum charge. The rate should include snacks or a meal.
Make it clear to clients that your facility is licensed and insured.
Parents must be advised beforehand of late fees if they pick up their children
later than promised or if you are forced to keep the center open later than its official
hours.
You should ask for payment by credit card or cash; there is some risk in
accepting a check from someone not known to you.
Legal and Insurance Issues
Special notes: Your contract should cover other issues, including legal guardianship
of the children. (You should not release a child to anyone other than the
parent or legal guardian without advanced written permission.)
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