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How to start Antiques and Collectibles Wholesaler business online to make money for individuals want to quit their jobs and start their careers as an entrepreneur are as follows:
Description of Job
• Take your sharp eye on the road in search of hidden and underpriced gems
at garage sales, tag sales, and flea markets.
• Research the market value of your finds and resell them to collectors or
auction houses.
The Need
Any careful shopper at a tag sale stands a good chance of picking up bargains,
like a never-used Crock-Pot for $5 or an extra set of plates that more or less
match the ones in your kitchen cupboard.
The more observant eye shops in search of the treasure within the trash:
real jewels among the faux, a valuable antique chair mixed in with cheap reproductions,
a work of art or rare print hidden among the neon paintings on black
velvet.
People have garage sales because they want to get rid of their extraneous
stuff; some of it should go directly to the dump, but sometimes you can uncover
great finds.
Don’t count on emulating the story of the Philadelphia tag sale shopper who
bought a painting for $4 because he liked the frame and, when he removed the
canvas, found an original of the Declaration of Independence that later sold at
auction for $2.42 million. That sort of lucky accident is nearly impossible to
replicate.
Much more likely are the stories you’ll see on television, like those on
Antiques Roadshow. For example, a set of dusty old handwritten ledgers picked
up at a tag sale were identified by a trained appraiser as former properties of Ben
Franklin; the books were valued at $12,000 to $18,000.
The job of the antiques and collectibles wholesaler is that of the huntergatherer;
your goal should be to turn around and resell the items to private clients
or to a wholesaler.
Challenges
The biggest challenge facing people who shop tag sales and flea markets as a
business is to avoid paying too much for items. You should develop and enhance
your expertise in a reasonable number of areas: jewelry, wooden furniture, historical
documents, Depression-era glassware, antique cameras, old radios, and
the like.
Spend the time to learn how to separate real items from reproductions. Learn
how to discover dates of manufacture, serial numbers, artists’ names, and other
identifying information. Find out the secrets of counterfeiters—artisans who
make modern versions of valuable Chippendale chairs or reprints of old documents
on artificially aged paper.
Know the Territory
Contact antique dealers and collectors to determine the sorts of items they are
most interested in buying and selling. Ask friends and acquaintances to put you
in contact with collectors who may have wish lists of items they are looking to
add to their shelves.
Learn the seasons and the locations for tag sales, garage sales, and flea markets.
Check prices for items at online web sites, including eBay.
Look for courses on antiques and collectibles at local community schools or
colleges.
How to Get Started
Make yourself known to owners of antiques stores and establish relationships;
you may be able to call them from the road and negotiate a price for resale before
you buy something you find. Look for clubs and organizations that attract collectors
and let them know you are available to help them fill their collections.
Up-front Expenses
You should build up a collection of books and research materials and have access
to the Internet. You’ll need to bear the expense of traveling in search of items.
You will have to lay out the money for your purchases and may have to pay
for shipping and storing items until they are resold.
Other expenses include advertising and promotion.
How Much to Charge
You will make your profit by reselling items at a price higher than you paid for
them, plus the cost of travel and shipping.

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