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How to start Genealogical Research business to make money for individuals want to quit their jobs and start their careers as an entrepreneur are as follows:
Description of Job
• Research the ancestry and family history for a client.
• Present a report with information and analysis based on your research.
The Need
Who are we, and where did we come from? For most of us, what we know of our
family history dates back only a generation or two. Our roots were lost when
ancestors emigrated from foreign lands, moved around the country, or were
buried with poorly maintained governmental, military, and religious records.
The urge to trace personal history often begins with the innocent interest of
youngsters and progresses to the more urgent inquiry of adults who see the glimmers
of mortality.
The professional genealogist uses traditional tools of library research, probate
records, birth and death certificates, records of religious ceremonies, and
marriage licenses. Some of the information exists in dusty paper records, but
increasingly the bits and pieces of our lives are floating in cyberspace and accessible
through the Internet. Even so, it requires some decent investigative skills
and dogged determination to do the job properly.
Challenges
You’ll need to understand the processes of genealogical research, have the determination
and drive of a detective, and know how to work equally well with computer
databases and old record books in musty vaults.
You’ll also have to maintain a professional skepticism in pursuit of the truth.
Your client may start out by telling you that he is descended from the royal family
of Denmark, or that she is the great-great-grandaughter of a Civil War general. Your
response, whether said aloud or kept to yourself, has to be: “We’ll see about that.”
Though nearly all current personal information is available in electronic
form, many modern laws are intended to protect the privacy of individuals. You
may need to obtain permission from your clients to examine records, or it may be
necessary for them to directly request the records and pass them along to you.
 Know the Territory
Some searches will go back several generations in the same town or area; many
others skip around from town to town, state to state, and reach back across borders
to family members who emigrated from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.
Begin by learning about available local and regional resources. Does your
town or state offer online access to records? What sort of identification or permission
is required?
Learn about the most common family histories for the people in your area.
For example, some parts of the country have a large proportion of second- or
third-generation immigrants from Ireland, Italy, or Scandinavia. Other places
have more recent immigrants from the Caribbean, Latin America, Russia, and
eastern Europe.
Become an expert on the sort of information you can expect to obtain from
foreign sources. In some countries, most of the records are likely to come from
church sources. In some former Communist states, records may be very detailed,
although access over the Internet may be limited.
United States and Canadian officials kept reasonably good records of new
arrivals during periods of major immigration, including the early part of the
twentieth century, and much of that information is available through government
and private web sites. Many of these sites have museums or visitor centers that
can provide information on those who entered through the port. Most Europeans
entered the United States through major ports in New York, Alexandria, Baltimore,
Boston, Galveston, Miami, and Savannah; in Canada, major ports included
those in Halifax and Quebec City.
The National Archives & Records Administration (NARA), a federal agency,
publishes guidebooks and offers publications and leaflets that may help you get
started in searching government records.
How to Get Started
Polish your skills by tracing your own ancestors before you start with paying
customers.
Develop a checklist of questions to ask your clients in the initial interview,
and a list of documents you would like to review. These include birth and death
certificates, wedding licenses, divorce decrees, adoption papers, and anything
else that might include details of your clients’ lives and those of their ancestors.
Ask for the details of any unsubstantiated family stories; even if they are
completely incorrect, there may be some kernels of information you could use in
your research.
Post your availability on bulletin boards at community centers, senior centers,
religious institutions, and elsewhere. Place ads in family- and communityoriented
newspapers and shopping guides.
Up-front Expenses
Invest in some good guides to genealogical research. You should also have access
to a computer with an Internet account, plus a good-quality printer.
Other expenses include advertising and promotion.
How Much to Charge
Charge an hourly rate for research; you may want to offer a basic search that is
limited to no more than 8 or 10 hours, or promise to check in with your clients
after each block of 10 hours to advise them of your progress and to get the okay
to keep the clock running for further research.

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